Main content

Blogs

Week 4- Shawn Farmand

What is science without research? The answer is simply nothing! Without research, there would be nothing to base any knowledge off of.  Researching plays a key role in the scientific process, as without it, there would be nothing to experiment.

Back in the day, people weren't as privileged as the new generation to just sit in a chair, type something on a computer, and have loads of information pop up in seconds! They might have had to go to the other side of the country to find one book! Now, we know so much more and it is all because of research. That, in my opinion, is why science has gained more in the last 20 years, than in the last 200,000 years! Read more

Week 4 - Austin Curtis

This week I spent some time thinking about if my project will really work like I want it to.

For it to work right;

1. I will have to come up with the right mix of special ingredients.
2. It has to be safe for people and the enviroment.
3. It can't be too expensive.

Right now I just got some of my "special ingredients" and now the real fun can begin! Read more

Young Scientist Challenge Blog 3: Deciding on a Issue/Solution

After narrowing down what current issues I wanted my invention to deal with, I was then faced with the question of how to solve them. For me, this was the fun part of my brainstorming process because I got to use creativity and imagination, and think beyond the boundaries of what has already been created and what is commonplace. In order to develop solutions to the problems I had selected, I tried to think about exactly why the issues had occurred in the first place, and what innovations could eliminate those issues. I also thought about how I could fit the solution into the average person's everyday life. When taking these things into consideration, I was able to develop stronger, more plausible solutions.  Read more

Doing research

Boiled down to one word research is tedious. You must be pretty patient in order to achieve any results from this because you have to sift through loads of information on the internet, which is anything but fast. Search engines are the best places to start especially google. You first want to look up what you are interested in on Wikipedia. Despite rumors that the information isn't very accurate it provides a great base for learning about a new topic but you should just find additional sources that back this information up. You then want to be way more specific and narrow down on what you specifically want to do and look at scientific journal articles since they describe background, procedures, and materials that were used in the experiment.

One thing is for sure you cannot solve any question without at least some research but most things require a lot of research. If you don't know something you would have to have a PhD in that area in order to design a correct experimental design to find the answer to your question, but you probably don't so just look it up. Read more

YSC Blog Post 3 -- [Cheyenne]

It was an easy process to narrow my list of problems down to three.  I simply chose the ones that excited me every time I thought about them.  However, it was harder to choose a single one to work on.  I ended up selecting the most developed one, but I could just as well have chosen a problem that I had no idea how to solve yet.  I would just have to think a bit more.

My mentor, Dr. Maria Appeaning, a chemist who specializes in adhesives, has been a huge help.  She approved my decision, and promptly sent me supplies and materials.  I couldn’t have gone far without her.

The problem that I chose requires testing of the 3M material that I will incorporate.  Although I can find a slew of information on the 3M websites, the particular parameter that I’m looking for has no information, because the material is not usually used the way I will utilize it.  Therefore, I must test them to figure out which one to use in my invention. Read more

Páginas