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Discovery Education

Doing research

Boiled down to one word research is tedious. You must be pretty patient in order to achieve any results from this because you have to sift through loads of information on the internet, which is anything but fast. Search engines are the best places to start especially google. You first want to look up what you are interested in on Wikipedia. Despite rumors that the information isn't very accurate it provides a great base for learning about a new topic but you should just find additional sources that back this information up. You then want to be way more specific and narrow down on what you specifically want to do and look at scientific journal articles since they describe background, procedures, and materials that were used in the experiment.

One thing is for sure you cannot solve any question without at least some research but most things require a lot of research. If you don't know something you would have to have a PhD in that area in order to design a correct experimental design to find the answer to your question, but you probably don't so just look it up. Read more

YSC Blog Post 3 -- [Cheyenne]

It was an easy process to narrow my list of problems down to three.  I simply chose the ones that excited me every time I thought about them.  However, it was harder to choose a single one to work on.  I ended up selecting the most developed one, but I could just as well have chosen a problem that I had no idea how to solve yet.  I would just have to think a bit more.

My mentor, Dr. Maria Appeaning, a chemist who specializes in adhesives, has been a huge help.  She approved my decision, and promptly sent me supplies and materials.  I couldn’t have gone far without her.

The problem that I chose requires testing of the 3M material that I will incorporate.  Although I can find a slew of information on the 3M websites, the particular parameter that I’m looking for has no information, because the material is not usually used the way I will utilize it.  Therefore, I must test them to figure out which one to use in my invention. Read more

Making mistakes

A few days ago I realized that I had overlooked a major flaw in my single idea, which is the viability of my solution. Fortunately for me my mentor Dr.Ylitalo spoke to a 3M microbiologist who quickly realized that my solution would not work and is not practical. So now I have readjusted my focus and found a new innovation that I can work on and I am right now talking with my mentor about whether it will work or not. Read more

Week 3- Shawn Farmand

The challenge so far has been coming along well. It was quite difficult to choose just one problem from three of my best! The biggest factor that influenced me to choose the idea I chose is because both the problem and the solution are very realistic.

Having a 3M scientist to guide me along this amazing journey has definitely helped me so far. I like how Dr. Oxman does not give me the answer, but gives me the inspiration for an idea. He has also guided me to a more scientific approach, henceforth, I realized how much more research I have to do! Read more

Week 3: Nolan Lenard

A lot has happened this week. My idea in my video has turned into a somewhat different device.

StreetHawk started out as a transmitter running on a solar power cell that can be picked up by a smart phone or navigation system. It looks like this.

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Young Scientist Challenge Week 2

Making observations was an easy process. As humans, we are curious to find ways to make our lives easier whether its the invention of the car or the microwave. It is also truly fascinating to see how past innovators have solved their problems by observation and reasoning. Many of them used existing products for, as the Mythbusters put it, ways they were never intended to. It is this ingenuity that I tried to keep in mind as I tried to identify problems with our everyday life that could be solved using technology. Read more

Choosing a single idea

After observing various problems in the environment and then dreaming up solutions to them I was having a very difficult time narrowing my focus down to just one of the solutions I had thought of. I first thought of which category of science that I was interested in and then I was able to narrow my choices down to 3 problems. I then thought of which one would be the most feasible to do and which solution I could incorporate a 3M product in. Then I discussed with my mentor about one of my solutions and I came up with a single solution that I wanted to concentrate all of my attention on. I think the biggest factor in my decision was which solution I would have the most fun working on. Read more

Week 2- Braeden Benedict

Welcome back, everybody!

As we conclude Week 2 of the Summer Program, I am completely engrossed in my project. I find choosing a problem to be the toughest part of any science research project. Taking my wide range of ideas and narrowing them down to just three was especially difficult.

I’ve found an interesting way to classify the observations I have made and the problems I have seen along what I call “The Spectrum of Importance.” Read more

YSC Blog Post 2 --

Well, the second week is almost over.  I’ve made a considerable amount of progress on my project.  The first step in the process is to make observations and figure out the problem causing them.  I thought this would be easy, but it was a lot harder than it seemed.  Although I kept an eye open for all sorts of problems during my day, not restricting them to the way we move, keep ourselves healthy, or make a difference, I still didn’t manage to come up with a lot of problems.

To solve that problem (haha!), I asked my friends and family members what frustrated them during their days. I ended up with a much larger flood of problems that I could try to come up with solutions to. This shows that scientists can’t just live in isolation and solve problems on their own. They must communicate with others in order to achieve a wider view of the world, and see things from multiple perspectives so that they can come up with the solution that best helps the population as a whole. Read more

Week 2- Shawn Farmand

I had my introductory call with my mentor, Dr. Joe Oxman, last week. He is an amazing scientist with many innovations and inventions. I am very excited and lucky to be working with him. This is an amazing opportunity and all the finalists should be very proud of themselves. Read more

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